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New To The Hobby If You Are New To The Hobby This Is The Place To Ask Your Initial Questions.

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Old 08-30-2007, 04:45 PM   2 links from elsewhere to this Post. Click to view. #1 (permalink)
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Default Reef Pests

Lets combined our years of experience and lets put together a thread of all the Reef Pests we know of.
This thread will include all pests from Acro eating flat worms to algeas.
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Old 08-30-2007, 04:58 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Sundial snails a zoanthid predator

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http://www.thesea.org/reef_aquarium/...sts_snails.php
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Old 08-30-2007, 09:16 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Montipora Eating Nudibranches

The Montipora Eating Nudibranch One of the more common and serious pests that have become an increasing issue is a species of nudibranch known to feed on the tissue of corals from the Montipora and Anacropora genus.
These nudibranchs can cause massive amounts of damage to coral in a very short amount of time. They are biologically designed to multiply at an astounding rate in an effort to compete with their constant predation in the wild. It is with no surprise that when you toss them into an environment with few if no predators, such as most home aquaria, these Nudibranchs thrive and are one of the many pests that aquarist keeping stony corals should be aware of...

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A close up of a nudibranch found feeding on the tissue of a colony of Montipora.
The nudibranchs themselves are typically small and rarely exceed ¾ of a centimeter in length.

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An egg laying adult and egg masses.

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A close-up of three egg laying adults with a large mass of eggs. The eggs are laid in multiple clusters of what appears to be between 10-30 individual eggs per cluster.

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This picture shows how much damage these pests cause and how quickly they can reach plague proportions.

The habits of the nudibranch give the impression that they are asexual, not needing another nudibranch in order to lay eggs. A single adult can lay over 100 eggs and once the eggs have been deposited on or around the host coral they only take a few days to hatch as they have already been incubating within the adult before being laid. The larvae start out very small, but within the first few days with an abundant food source present they grow quickly, reaching adult size in less than a week after hatching.

Last edited by wobbegong; 08-30-2007 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 08-31-2007, 02:00 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Acro Eating Flatworms
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http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh...hreadid=756327
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Old 08-31-2007, 02:03 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Gorilla Crabs, Stone Crabs, Mantis Shrimp
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http://www.tbsaltwater.com/thepackage/watchout.html
http://www.blueboard.com/mantis/

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Old 08-31-2007, 02:12 PM   1 links from elsewhere to this Post. Click to view. #7 (permalink)
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Acropora Red Bugs
Acropora Red Bugs

Identification
One of the most recent "pests" who have now become prevalent is a very small crustacean that looks like a mite and appears to prefer most species of Acropora corals. This crustacean is yellow in color with a red dot, approximately 1/2 mm in length, and is very difficult to see without a magnifying glass. It has been theorized that red bugs are either a parasitic form of copepod or micro-amphipod, though very little research has been done and their true identification is not complete at this time.

Symptoms & Signs
It has been speculated that the crustacean feeds off of the slime and waste products produced by the Acroporas. If you have an established colony of Acropora sp. that begins losing coloration and stops showing normal polyp extension, take a closer look at the tissue of the coral for any small yellowish/red specks. It is oftentimes easiest to distinguish these pests on the shadowed underside of a branch. An infected colony of Acropora will typically show poor or no polyp extension, and will slowly lose coloration over time. As a result of this infestation, it has been found that the growth rate of the colony is seriously affected, and may even result in death to the coral itself.

It is not clear why these bugs prefer certain species of Acropora over others, nor is it clear why they are not found on other SPS corals such as Montipora, Pocillopora, or Seriatopora.

Treatment
Several methods of treatment - from introducing natural predators to medications - have been tested with various levels of success.

Introduce Dragonface Pipefish (Corythoichthys haematopterus) to the quarantine or display aquarium. Once the fish are settled in and adjusted to the aquarium conditions, the small pipefish will anchor themselves on the branches of Acropora and begin to feed on tiny crustaceans as well as red bugs.


Dip the Acropora into a concentrated iodine and aquarium water mixture for approximately 15 minutes using a clean plastic container. Lugol's solution is the preferred iodine base for this procedure, along with other commercially available coral dips, such as Reef Dip by SeaChem.


The last method, developed by Dustin Dorton at ORA, involves treating the aquarium or quarantine aquarium with Milbemycin oxime. This chemical is the active ingredient in Interceptor, a de-worming medication for dogs only available by prescription from a Veterinarian. This medication has been found to directly attack crustaceans, and is the most invasive and risky treatment mentioned thus far because it does not discriminate between pests and other inhabitants like shrimp, amphipods, copepods, and crabs. Since this treatment may cause all crustaceans in your system to perish, it is important to either remove and treat the infected colonies in a separate aquarium, or to remove the crustaceans that you wish to save to a different holding aquarium. Exact guidelines for the dosages and treatment regime are still in the testing phase, yielding positive results, but the long-term ramifications of this new treatment are still not known.
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Old 08-31-2007, 02:46 PM   #8 (permalink)
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great job with the info on this thread
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Old 08-31-2007, 03:30 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I have some bristle worms and then Green Bubble algae from time to time...I also had a bad aptasia outbreak in my Overflow for a while, but a healthy dosing of Kaukweisser water into a plugged up overflow and then redrained took care of them...The worst pest though is my Banded Coral Shrimp...from time to time he likes to eat my snails and hermit crab friends..
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Old 09-03-2007, 08:02 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Avoiding Algae Problems in Marine Systems

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/avoidingalgaeproblesm.htm

Nuisance Algae in the Reef Aquarium

Part I

Part II

Part III
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Old 09-12-2007, 08:36 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Thought I add to this thread.....
Elimination of a predatory nudibranch
http://www.reeffarmers.com/tracygraynudi01.htm
Montipora Nudibranchs
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2007-09/eb/index.php
Marine Parasitic Diseases
http://www.reeftime.com/reef-article...iseases/18.htm


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Old 10-11-2007, 09:20 AM   #12 (permalink)
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This was very informative and now i know what to look for
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Old 10-11-2007, 10:20 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Predators
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Old 10-20-2007, 06:08 PM   #14 (permalink)
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I HATE aptasia's and the chemicals ive bought to kill them dont get the job done
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Old 10-23-2007, 10:47 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daffydanny View Post
I HATE aptasia's and the chemicals ive bought to kill them dont get the job done
I have killed aptasia by squirting boiling RO water at them.
Do not attempt if you have corals near the aptasia.
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Old 10-23-2007, 02:45 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I tried Kalc works some what but a PIA.. So I purchase a Copper band butterfly from Suffolk county fish and reef.. now I don't have any in my main tank..but tons in my refugium. The CBB has to now settle for frozen foods..
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Old 10-23-2007, 02:57 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I have tried , kalk , joes juice and blue life or something like that. all are a PITA. Then tried peppermint shrimp after a few of them , I finally got one that eats all the aiptasias in my tank . natural predators are the way to go ..CCB are good as well , But not a fish for new hobbyist.
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Old 10-27-2007, 07:35 AM   #18 (permalink)
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additional article that has some good stuff we already covered but more in depth.

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Old 10-31-2007, 04:37 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Hi all!
Thought I would add my ID pages as well. I hope that they are of use.

A Hitch Hikers Guide to the Reefs

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Old 12-14-2007, 07:27 PM   #20 (permalink)
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hey all thank you for all the info, I know now what to look out for, Thank you again.
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website to pics of reef 'bugs' and info......... This thread Refback 12-08-2010 07:21 PM
Pests Invading the Reef Aquarium Hobby: Red Bugs & Nudibranchs - Nano-Reef.com Forums Post #0 Refback 10-16-2009 07:09 AM
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